Thursday, June 29, 2017

Exhibition - Strange Fire Collective

Exhibition: Call and Response: Art as resistance 
March 31 
 Syntax Physic Opera, Denver, CO
Curated from our first open call for work, Call and Response: Art as Resistance features artists making work in response to the current social and political climate in the United States. This exhibition is hosted in collaboration with the Center for Fine Art Photography, Colorado Photographic Arts Center and Month of Photography Denver. 
About Strange Fire
The Strange Fire artist collective is a group of interdisciplinary artists, curators, and writers focused on work that engages with current social and political forces. We seek to create a venue for work that critically questions the dominant social hierarchy and are dedicated to highlighting work made by women, people of color, and queer and trans artists. 
Our collective practice is centered around increasing the visibility of meaningful work and creating dialogue and community through publications, exhibitions, and events.   We are committed to making our projects accessible, affordable, and socially relevant. 
Strange Fire was formed in 2015 by Jess T. Dugan, Rafael Soldi, Zora J. Murff, and Hamidah Glasgow.
Political Intervention #1 - response to Trump Candidacy 

























Political Intervention #2 - In response to Trump Travel Ban  1/27/17 -Executive Order 13769, titled Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United .... The Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015, which was previously passed by ... shooting that occurred on the same date, Trump used Twitter to renew his call for a Muslim immigration ban.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Exhibition - FEED zine

Our FEED zine was created as a reaction to the first one hundred days of the new regime.
Barb had been following the Twitter feed @RogueSNRadvisor as a respite from the REAL news.  Lindsay had been exploring neuropsychological marketing by rendering industrial and fast food logos as abstracted feel-good auras. These elements came together in FEED, a compendium of Trump crisis and diet-management reports.
"The notion that decent, well-meaning folks are keeping vigil on Trump from inside the palance walls is a form of escapism, like alcohol or James Bond movies. Properly understood, it's not fake news; it's fiction as self-care."  --Katy Waldman  "Rogue Twitter Feeds as Liberal Self-Care"  - Slate Magazine































The project, #3 of our "political interventions,"  was recently exhibited at Magnum Foundation's AWAKE Book and Zine Bazaar.
also featured at the Ithaca College - ITI Symposium exploring creative, publishing and curatorial work by an international roster of artists, June 30 and July 1, 2017




Research - Industrial Food News

Both General Mills Inc. and ConAgra Brands Inc. are facing lower sales due to the lessening demand for processed foods. General Mills has found that removing synthetic food dyes promotes sales, as consumers turn to organic and synthetic-free foods.

"Reddi-Whip is advertising its use of 'real cream' rather than hydrogenated oils, and 'no artificial growth hormone'. Hunt's is promoting how it peels its tomatoes with steam, rather than chemicals. ConAgra's website for Hebrew National hot dogs brags that they have no artificial flavors, no fillers and no byproducts because 'the shorter the ingredients list, the better.'" writes Annie Gesparro.

Grocery stores are seeing a growing demand for hot, fresh foods as opposed to boxed pasta with powder sauces. Grocers are promoting their fresh goods instead their cereals, cookies, and other processed treats.
"...Grocery-store chains around the country are building new stores that have less space for traditional packaged foods in the center aisles and more for in-store restaurants and fresh meals shoppers can take home." writes Annie Gesparro.
In other news, Pringles can inventor Frederic J. Baur had a bizarre final wish - to have his ashes buried in a Pringles can. Upon his passing, the family chose to place his ashes in a can of the original flavored Pringles, at rest with his invention forever.
Image result for fredric j baur pringles
RIP Frederic J. Baur

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Publication - Chaeg

We were pleased to have our work included in Chaeg Magazine - Food Issue, no. 26, May 2017.





 Chaeg is a Korean produced periodical that specializes in all things culture, art, and books. Chaeg was first published in November 2014 and continues to release monthly issues.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Publication - Mockingbird

We were please that our work was included in the The Mockingbird Magazine  - Food and Drink Issue, volume 9, Winter 2017


The Mockingbird is a not profit periodical published by Mockingbird Ministries, an organization and media platform seeking to connect the Christian faith with the realities of everyday life in fresh and down-to-earth ways.

Exhibition - Center for Fine Art Photography - Ft. Collins CO

Processed Views    
Fort Collins, Colorado

Janury 13 through March 19, 2017
Artists' Talk February 17, 6:00 -7:00pm
Public and Artists' Reception  7:00 -8:00pm

Installation, including Sugar Geology

Installation:  Enhanced Varieties

many thanks for a beautiful installation to Hamida Glasgow, Director
Sunshine Divas and Ren Burke

Processed Views Installation  with Sugar Geology and Cola Sea in foreground

Publication - Internazionale Magazine

 We were requested by Photo Editor, Melissa Jollivet for work to illustrate their article in Internazionale Magazine, an Italian independent weekly magazine publishing the best articles from the worldwide quality press translated into Italian.  Our Images, Moonlight over Bologna and Saturated Fat Foothills accompanied a cholesterol research article by science author, journalist and broadcaster, Michael Brooks. The author reminds readers that “after it was shown that there is a  connection between cholesterol and diseases of the heart, people have increased theuse of statins around the world.Some studies, however, question the preventive use of these drugs and warn of the array of side-effects.”
Brooks is contributor to New Scientist, a magazine with over three quarters of a million readers worldwide. He is the author of At The Edge of Uncertainty, The Secret Anarchy of Science and the bestselling non-fiction title 13 Things That Don't Make Sense.
Internazionale Magazine   via Volturno, 58    00185 Roma – Italia      0039 064417301

Radio Interview - WBUR - Processed Views

Radio Interview - WBUR - Processed Views


As Americans dive into Thanksgiving leftovers, it's a time to reflect on how far some of our favorite foods have ventured away from "fresh and natural" to "highly processed" with fats, sugars and salts.

On November 25, Barbara joined  WBUR  Here & Now reporter and host, Peter O'Dowd  to talk  about depicting Carleton Watkin’s epic scenes from the American west — with junk food.

"One woman who thinks a lot about how we got to this point in modern consumption is Barbara Ciurej. She and her longtime art collaborator, Lindsay Lochman, have an exhibit on that very subject on display now in Denver at the Colorado Photographic Arts Center called "Processed Views."

Images from the exhibit, along with their original inspiration, were shown





Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Research - Real Food Fake Food

In Real Food, Fake Food, food journalist Larry Olmsted has researched various food products, making us re-evalute both assumptions and mythology regarding the quality of our food.























According to Kirkus Reviews, it is “an enlightening but frequently disturbing culinary journey. While providing fascinating insights into where and how some of the most delicious food products are produced, the author also reveals how often these are imitated to detrimental effect…A provocative yet grounded look at the U.S. food industry.”

Research - Nadia Berenstein blog

A scholar of flavor technology, Nadia Berenstein, has amassed a wealth of information regarding all things flavorful, imitation and natural, on her thoughtful blog. Some history and ideas from numerous posts:
“…the role of the flavor chemist in a flavor company, [is] negotiating between the sensory possibilities of chemicals and the sensual desires of consumers…. The successful flavor also must reflect consumer tastes, expectations, and, especially, fashions.”
“…the flavorist is in a fashion business, and must constantly produce novel sensations, new variations for a public hungry for untasted fruits, unsampled pleasures, both low delights and high ones.”
“The real creative flavor maker appreciates the inevitable fact that the world eventually tires of perfection itself. There is no perfect. There is only the pluripotent new, perpetually refreshed by the stream of newly discovered synthetic organic chemicals. ...notes. It's all aroma, there's very little actual "taste" to it, but the aroma is masterfully constructed,….”
‘The real creative flavor maker appreciates the inevitable fact that the world eventually tires of perfection itself. There is no perfect. There is only the pluripotent new, perpetually refreshed by the stream of newly discovered synthetic organic chemicals. ...notes. It's all aroma, there's very little actual "taste" to it, but the aroma is masterfully constructed…”
Berenstein also  works as a freelance writer. Among her articles is one from Popular Science, reviewing  food writer Bee Wilson’s new book, First Bite: How We Learn to Eat.


















“Eating is something we must learn how to do, but it is not something we learn once and for all. The mistake is to assume that our appetites are inborn and indisputable, and our habits are immutable. This is why the most important lesson of this book is this: pleasure matters. And what we find pleasurable can change, a process that she calls a "hedonic shift." We can't expect to eat better, if we don't like what we eat. “

Wilson is know for her first book, Consider the Fork, a wonderful and witty tour of the evolution of cooking around the world, revealing the hidden history of everyday objects we often take for granted.


Research - Food Marketing Wall of Shame


The Food Marketing Workgroup is a network of more than 225 organizations and academic experts who are concerned about the proliferation of marketing of unhealthful foods and beverages that targets children and adolescents. This national network, convened by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and Berkeley Media Studies Group (BMSG), is dedicated to eliminating harmful food marketing — particularly marketing aimed at those who are most vulnerable to obesity and other nutrition-related diseases — by actively identifying, investigating, and advocating changes to marketing practices that undermine health.
Food Marketing Workgroup WALL OF SHAME


The FMW fosters ideas and momentum around national, state, and local strategies. It serves as a forum for researchers and advocates to share information, support one another’s work, and identify priorities for research and action. The FMW shares what it learns with parents, the public, and policymakers. It also appeals directly to companies to improve their marketing practices.

Research - Flavor Technology - Ted Talks

TED Talks, a favorite clearinghouse of ideas, has compiled a few talks for their radio hour specificially addressing current food concerns, ideas, marketing, and the future of the planet:

The Food We Eat

Food is more than nourishment. It's a source of pleasure — and guilt — and an agent of change. TED speakers explore our deep connection to food, and where it's headed:
Mark Bittman: How Has The American Diet Changed Over Time?
Pam Warhurst: How Does Food Become A Tool For Connection?
Robert Lustig: How Worried Should We Be About Sugar?
Charles Spence: What Defines The Perfect Meal?
Marcel Dicke: Are Insects The Future Of Food?

Food Matters
A cornucopia about food: growing it, cooking it, consuming it and making sure there's enough for everyone.
Carolyn Steel: How Does Food Shape Cities?
Cary Fowler And Ann Cooper: Can We Protect Food's Future And Improve School Lunch?
Dan Barber: Does Good Flavor Equal Sustainability?